UCLA/Getty Conservation Program

A graduate conservation training program focusing on the conservation of archaeological and ethnographic materials


Leave a comment

UCLA/Getty Program Welcomes Bianca Garcia, Program Manager for the Mellon Opportunity for Diversity in Conservation

The UCLA/Getty Program is pleased to welcome Bianca Garcia as the new Program Manager for the Andrew W. Mellon Opportunity for Diversity in Conservation.

Bianca is a Paintings Conservator. She received her B.A. in Art Conservation from the University of Delaware, and her M.S. in Art Conservation from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. She has worked at the Balboa Art Conservation Center, Cleveland Museum of Art, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Western Center for the Conservation of Fine Arts, and the Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico.

To find out more information on the Opportunity for Diversity in Conservation or to get application details for the upcoming workshop to be held in July 2019, please visit: uclagettydiversityinitiative.wordpress.com.

IMG_3359

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Class of 2018 Presentations & Alumni Reunion

It’s near end of the quarter and tomorrow the class of 2018 returns to our conservation training labs at the Getty Villa to give their final presentations as graduate students in our program.  They will be presenting on their 3rd year internships, as well as discussing the work they did for their MA thesis projects.  The day will end with a  small reception to celebrate the completion of their conservation degree and graduation.

This year we also have our first alumni reunion organized around the presentation and graduation event.  Alumni will not only be in attendance tomorrow , but have organized a reunion day on Saturday that includes lightning round presentations highlighting their current work and/or research.

A list of the class of 2018 3rd year internship placements can be found on this previous post.   Here is a list of the M.A. thesis research they will be sharing with us:

  • Morgan Burgess – Digitizing Conservation: An Approach to Reconstruction and Loss Compensation using Digital 3D Technologies
  • Marci Burton – A Technical Study of a Pre-Columbian Chilean Child Mummy Bundle from Arica, Chile
  • Mari Hagemeyer – Exploratory Investigations into the Effectiveness of a Novel Treatment for Denatured Leather and Skin Materials
  • Hayley Monroe – Conditioning Basketry Elements with Water and Ethanol: An Investigation into the Effects of Existing Conservation Methods
  • Lindsay Ocal – Materials, Technology and Conservation of Ceramic Vessels from the Site of Amapa in Nayarit, Mexico
  • Michaela Paulson – The Visible Effects of Adhesives and Pressure on Color in Kingfisher Feathers

Congratulations to the class of 2018! We look forward to celebrating with them, and our alumni, and hearing about all the wonderful work all the current and past UCLA/Getty grads have been doing!

 

20017720_10155025251587981_1012376688616846809_o

Hayley Monroe shows Julia Parker (Miwok-Kashaya Pomo weaver) the treatment she undertook on a Yosemite Museum basket attributed to Lucy Telles (Mono Lake Paiute – Kucadikadi and Southern Sierra Miwok basket weaver)

 

 


Leave a comment

Class of 2020 Summer Internships

We’re just wrapping up the last week of instruction for the spring quarter and as the students are finishing up treatments and other assignments for their classes (as well as studying for exams next week), they’re also getting ready to head out to their summer internship sites.

Here is a list of all the sites and institutions they’ll be working at this summer:

The students will be presenting on their summer internships when they’re back in the fall and we’re looking forward to hearing all about their amazing work!  Stay tuned to our social media sites for any posts and/or images from their internships. Hope everyone has a great summer and safe travels!

 

VRPG17_conservation

Skyler Jenkins reconstructs a ceramic vessel during the 2017 season of the Villa Romana di Poggio Gramignano excavations.


Leave a comment

Off to the Great White North-ANAGPIC 2018

Just as our students are returning from Spring Break and settling into the start of the spring quarter, they are also getting ready to head out to this year’s ANAGPIC conference.  This year the conference is hosted by Queen’s University and will take place this week, April 5th-7th.

At this year’s ANAGPIC conference,  we have 2 presentations in the main session, one from 2 first-year students, and the other from one of our third years.  We also have two first years presenting in the lightning round.  Make sure to check out the abstracts of their talks below.

It looks to be an exciting conference covering a wide range of materials and techniques.  Our students are really looking forward to hearing the presentations, meeting students from other programs and presenting their own work.

Good luck to all those presenting and we hope everyone has a great time at this year’s ANAGPIC conference!  (and we’ll be wishing some of our SoCal springtime weather their way!)

 

IpuHeke_Jenkins

Image of an ipu heke from the collection of the Connecting Cultures Mobile Museum.  Skyler Jenkins will be presenting her treatment of this object in this year’s lightning round session.


ANAPGIC 2018 Presentation Abstracts

Analytical Imaging, Visualization and Interpretation of a Byzantine Icon
Austin Anderson, Emily Rezes, Karime Castillo
Advisor: Dr. Ioanna Kakoulli

A Byzantine icon depicting a female saint against a gold background was examined noninvasively using analytical imaging. The construction of the icon shows the typical Byzantine tradition, composed of a wooden support with a white preparation layer applied directly on the wood, gilded, painted and varnished. For the analysis of the icon and to document the technique, condition and previous interventions at surface and subsurface, visible reflectance images using diffused light were initially taken using a DSLR Nikon D90. Imaging beyond the visible was supported by broadband reflectance and luminescence imaging at specific wavelengths from the ultraviolet region (~ 350 nm) to the near infrared region ( ~1000 nm) using a modified (with the hot mirror of the camera removed) Nikon D90. Illumination was provided by a Mini-CrimeScope (an alternate light source (ALS)). Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) was also undertaken to highlight topographic details of the surface. Results from the analytical imaging were able to resolve and unmask important information on the ID of the female figure, identified as Virgin Mary, and to reveal technical and condition details in areas of varnish, pigment, and white preparation. The visualization of incisions and stamped elements indicated an intricate preparation to delineate the iconography, whereas, the mapping of cracks, flaking and losses revealed the fragile nature and condition of the icon.

A Mask on the Move: Analysis and Treatment of an African Mask for Traveling Exhibition
Lindsay Ocal
Advisor: Ellen Pearlstein

An African mask was acquired by the Connecting Cultures Mobile Museum (CCMM), a Los Angeles non-profit organization with a diverse collection of global arts and artifacts. By bringing their exhibitions to local schools, CCMM’s aim is to instill in students an understanding and respect for cultural diversity. This particular mask is in the form of an antelope and made of painted wood with a plant fiber ruff. Upon acquisition by CCMM, the piece had a broken horn, evidence of current pest activity, and was rapidly shedding plant fibers. As a result of an ongoing relationship between the UCLA/Getty Conservation Program faculty and the CCMM, the mask’s condition prompted CCMM staff to contact the program for assistance. As very little was known about the object, art historical and anthropological research was carried out to identify the culture that made the piece, how it was made, and the context in which it was used. Scientific analysis and examination identified the materials used both in the initial creation of the piece and in later repairs to the broken horn. The object’s condition issues required that it undergo several treatment procedures, including pest eradication, cleaning, removal of unsuitable previous repair materials, and reattachment and stabilization of the broken horn. Lastly, a mount and box were constructed that would be suitable for travel, storage, and display.


ANAPGIC 2018 Lightning Round Presentations

Examination and Treatment of a Vejigante Mask
Elena Bowen
Advisor: Ellen Pearlstein

Analysis and Treatment of an Ipu Heke
Skyler Jenkins
Advisor: Ellen Pearlstein


Leave a comment

UCLA/Getty Program Welcomes Class of 2020!

This week marks the start of fall quarter classes here at our Getty Villa Conservation Training Labs and we our excited to welcome the class of 2020 to the UCLA/Getty Program.

Their first day of classes included an introduction to documentation and imaging techniques, as well an introduction to the technology of ceramics, glass and glazes. This quarter they’ll also be taking a class on the technology and deterioration of organic materials and another course that provides an overview of science fundamentals.

We wish the class of 2018 good luck with their coursework and lots of success in the conservation program!

IMG_0236

The Class of 2020: (L to R) Austin Anderson, Emily Rezes, Elena Bowen, Kasey Hamilton, Skyler Jenkins and Megan Salas

 


Leave a comment

Class of 2018 Summer & 3rd Year Internships

We’ve just entered the last week of the quarter, with finals week fast approaching.  As the students try to wrap up their MA thesis projects and course work, they are also preparing to head out for summer and 3rd year internships.  Below is a list of all the fantastic sites and institutions they’ll be working at in the upcoming year.

We’re looking forward to hearing all about the amazing work they’ll be undertaking when they are back for their 3rd year presentations and graduation in Spring 2018. We wish them good luck on their internships and safe travels!


Leave a comment

Conservation and Ethnography: Promoting Cultural Heritage in Southern California

Last quarter, UCLA/Getty students took the course “Conservation and Ethnography” (CAEM 222) taught by Prof. Ellen Pearlstein. The goal for the class was to acquaint students with the changing emphasis of conservation, from neutral acts based purely on material properties, to a series of humanistic and scientific decisions that consider the heritage source, its specific communities, the current and future roles for heritage, as well as evolving technical developments for both prevention and treatment. Through the examination and treatment of southern California basketry, students learned about these aspects of conservation as well as focused on the processes and properties of California (and neighboring) states’ native basketry, deterioration mechanisms and conservation treatment methods.

In addition to treating southern California baskets from the collection of the Agua Caliente Cultural Museum and the Yosemite Museum, students were asked to imagine that in addition to creating their documentation for the next conservator, that they are creating it to assist Cahuilla weavers, ethnobotanists, revivalists, cultural descendants, or museum board and staff members in using their class project basket to answer questions and to promote culture. You can find links to the documentation they produced below.